Digital Geography

GIS with javascript – tutorial part 1

An article from Anders. Geodata in javascript GeoJSON is the standard way of storing geodata in JSON, javascripts native data format. The wikipedia article has very clear and telling examples. If you have never heard of GeoJSON, read it. The aim of this article is to show you how to convert your geodata to GeoJSON and some basics in querying the data.

Show your Photos in QGIS and ArcGIS: a small example

Hi guys. Once again I found an interesting question in our Geoscientists group on facebook. One user wanted to show her photos in QGIS as she is it used from Google Maps: See a point, click on it and see the great image you’ve taken on your journey. Unfortunately the most obvious plugins failed to do it in QGIS. So check out our “at least” two usage scenarios for QGIS and ArcGIS where we will handle geotagged photos…

Open Data in the UK

The Ordnance Survey is UK’s mapping agency and frequently releases free datasets. Their OpenData policy is quite progressive compared to Germany’s and they’ve recently published some fresh datasets that anyone can use. All you need to do is to register and to acknowledge them. The new datasets are: OS Open Map – Local; OS Open Names; OS Open Rivers; and OS Open Roads. They include data on urban and rural features, an index for all the location names in the UK, a generalised open water network, UK’s connected road network and much more. All this adds up to their existing…

GISconnector for Excel

GISconnector for Excel – the beginning of a beautiful friendship between ArcGIS and Excel The GISconnector transforms ArcGIS and Excel into an ingenious overall system: The power of Excel is available in ArcGIS and vice versa – ArcGIS and Excel turn into an integrated working environment. This unique combination enables a smooth transfer of data and functions between the two programs – this works without an editing session. The GISconnector for Excel software completely revolutionizes the way you work with ArcGIS – a giant step towards time saving and error minimization. 2 Add-ins communicate with each other: Use the shortest…

A small tool with Python: the shapefile archiver

Let me introduce to you, guys, my first Python tool: “Shapefile Archiver”. Usually, I face lots of problems in managing my shapefiles. My first problem is backing them up in a decent way, especially, before starting some experimental things on them (That sounds scary!), while the second problem is that Finder/Windows explorer doesn’t tell me about the shapefile more than its name!. Moreover, Finder/Windows explorer shows the shapefile as a bunch of files (*.shp, *.prj, *.shx, *.dbf,…) which makes me feel annoyed especially because I’m too lazy to open QGIS browser or ArcCataloge every time I want to explore my…

ILWIS GIS – Tutorial I [Introduction]

Today I’ll start with a new series of tutorials for an open Source GIS called “ILWIS GIS“. ILWIS is the short term for “Integrated Land and Water Information System” developed at the ITC Enschede and distributed under the GNU General public license as open Source GIS since 2007. It’s purposes is designed for geoecological questions. It can handle both, vector- and rasterdata.     If you’re interessted in ILWIS you can download the newest version here: http://52north.org/communities/ilwis/ilwis-open/download. The software package is available for the following operation systems: Windows and with the use of additional software on Linux and Mac OS X. The language…

OpenSource QGIS + PostGIS installation: “the Windows way”

A short time ago I’ve posted an article on the installation of QGIS in combination with a PostGIS database in the background. As we all know, Windows is mostly used as OS on a PC so this is the Windowized version. This is a short summary that sums up the article of a site called Boston GIS. I’ll show you how to install QGIS version 1.8 (which will be updated in some days) and PostgreSQL with PostGIS extension and show you the first steps in the import of shapefiles and raster data.

create a web-map: step 2 or DIY

Since we have managed to get a very simple web-map running on our website, it may be a need for some persons to distribute their own shapefiles using a web-map. In this case it is a good choice to take a closer look on GeoServer. This will provide the mapping engine and uses the OpenLayers library for this as well. But you can skip using the basemaps and just share and show your own shapefiles and raster.

create and edit shapefiles with Python only

Some days ago I’ve presented a way to load and monitor the content of a shapefile using pyshp. But since then I was remembering my work with shapefiles in my basic R-seminars and the way we have used the gdal-library for our data management. So I searched the web and found comparable solutions for the project “where are your customers” in Python. You was probably using open source solutions already or are a user of ArcGIS and was frickling around with the Python-interface (new in ArcGIS since version 10). I would like to show you here some basic steps to…

importing shapefiles in Python

Python is a very common scripting language which seems like a swiss knife for programming. This is the reason to use it as a framework for the program “where are your customers“. In this context I need to import the shapefile into Python. Therefore the guys at geospatialpython present a nice module to import shapefiles into python. First install the file using easy-install/pip. Therefore open the terminal: