Digital Geography

Vessel tracking the python way

Let’s assume you like cruise ships, tanker, ferries or you’re so fortunate and own a fleet of vessels cruising over the oceans. But where the heck are the ones you’re interested in. First you can visit MarineTraffic and search for the Vessels you’re interested in. But what if you want to keep track of those vessels or if you want to put them on your “own” map. Now Python comes in handy and I’ll show you how to gather coordinates and put them on a map using the ArcGIS API for Python.

Query OpenStreetMap in ArcGIS: OSMQuery

QUickOSM is my weapon of choice when it comes to downloading data from OSM in QGIS. The tool offers an easy way to access tag/key combinations with a designated spatial query. As I was asked how many bus stops Berlin has, I was interested in a similar approach for ArcGIS. So I created my own little tool: OSMQuery.

Service Areas, Traffic and QGIS

Our author Riccardo recently published an article on GeoNet where he described the traffic aware analysis of service areas (isochrones) in ArcGIS Pro with the analytical support of ArcGIS Online. I searched for a way to do something similar in QGIS. So let’s follow the white rabbit.

Observing deforestation with Sentinel-1

While preparing for an upcoming presentation at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) I came across a topic that I thought might make an interesting blog post.  The presentation is about using data from the Sentinel-1 mission for Earth Science applications.  The Sentinel-1 spacecraft are C-band SAR systems launched and operated by the European Space Agency (ESA).  An innovative aspect of this mission is that the collection scenario devised by ESA is systematic and very broad in coverage.  Using Sentinel-1 we can monitor Earth using SAR data like never before.

Python and Webmaps: folium

We have seen some easy ways to create webmaps without learning JavaScript or loosing sort of control of our data in terms of using a platform like cartoDB, mapbox or AGOL (ArcGis OnLine). There are R and QGIS connectors which translates your current data and project to a leaflet or openlayers based webmap. Today I worked with folium which creates a webmap directly from Python. Follow me!

The new flickr2qgis plugin for QGIS

In the last week I saw a post on the German ESRI page called GIS-IQ which featured a new widget for ArcGIS which needs you to have the “ArcGIS Web AppBuilder Developer Edition 1.2”. This widget lets you fetch images from flickr and probably show it on the map. I haven’t tried it yet but I thought: lets build something similar for QGIS… so here is my flickr API plugin for QGIS

Routing in QGIS… with OSM

Routing with Google is quite cool as the database/network is probably the best currently available. But the terms of services limit the possible usage. So what about OpenStreetMap? By figuring out how to use OSM for routing I found it much easier to get routes into QGIS with OSM compared to the Google way. Check it out….

CSV to SHP with Python

Python is a well established script language in the GIS/geodata world. And as a Facebook friend asked how to read csvs with Python I thought about “How to convert a csv to a shp with Python?”. Keeping in mind that most GPS solutions and many internet tools offers a csv export and it’s common in any stats/spreadsheet program this can be a handy solution for your everyday life. See my solution here…

AHP for ArcGIS 10.x using Python

When it comes to site selection problems or suitability models, the spatial Multi-Criteria Analysis (Weighted Overlay) is the most commonly used method. It’s easy, simple and popular. However, if it’s your first time to come across this method, it’s highly recommended to have a look at this link. After defining the problem you want to solve, the next 4-steps are followed to perform this method. Determine significant layers. Reclassify the layers. Weight the input layers. Sum up the weighted layers My concern was always about how I can assign a weight to each layer in a kind of scientific way.…

Geocoding Addresses in ArcGIS: the other approach

Today I stumbled upon a post from the German ESRI office and their blog gisIQ and a little tutorial (English translation) on how to geocode addresses in the ArcGIS platform. I was asking, whether there is a possibility to use other geocoders as well and so I tried to build my own solution without credits and with the possibility to choose a geocoder. Fortunately the Python world offers some nice little scripts. So let’s use geopy!

Creating ARCs in QGIS: The Python Way

So I came across this nice little project which focussed on trip planning and route over large distances… And there was this nice little post from Nathan Yau at flowingdata.com where he describes the making of great circles from one point to different other points in R and the other example from Anita Graser where she shows how to deal with an Arc in QGIS but using postgis functionality. So what about QGIS itself and a programmatic way? See yourself…

A small tool with Python: the shapefile archiver

Let me introduce to you, guys, my first Python tool: “Shapefile Archiver”. Usually, I face lots of problems in managing my shapefiles. My first problem is backing them up in a decent way, especially, before starting some experimental things on them (That sounds scary!), while the second problem is that Finder/Windows explorer doesn’t tell me about the shapefile more than its name!. Moreover, Finder/Windows explorer shows the shapefile as a bunch of files (*.shp, *.prj, *.shx, *.dbf,…) which makes me feel annoyed especially because I’m too lazy to open QGIS browser or ArcCataloge every time I want to explore my…