Digital Geography

Anaconda: a interesting Python distribution

When working with GIS and statistical data there is an emerging need to know some scripting language. Python is one of the most widely used. It is not perfect but it is like a geographer: fairly good at nearly everything: “For scientific purposes, when writing a small specialized script, Python may often be the second best choice: for linear algebra, Matlab may have nicer syntax; for statistics, R is probably nicer; for heavy regular expression usage, Perl (ugh) might still be nicer; if you want speed, Fortran or C(++) may be a better choice. To design a webpage; perhaps you…

short announcement: TopoToolbox 2: Geomorphometry made easy in MATLAB

< p align=”justify”>Digital elevation models (DEMs) exist today for the entire globe with consistent quality. Improvements in sensors and data processing give a clue that in the future elevation data will be available in even better spatial resolution and accuracy. Discovering the richness of information inherent in DEMs should thus be supported by good software. Here, I want to give a brief account of TopoToolbox 2, the second version of a MATLAB toolbox for exploring and analyzing DEMs. Dirk Scherler from Caltech and I have been working on many changes to the previous version to make TopoToolbox faster, more memory…

FastGAPP – Fast Geochemical Analysis Plotting Program

Geochemical studies of igneous rocks are fundamental to classify rock types in terms of main-, minor-, trace element whole-rock chemistry. Together with petrographic observations from thin sections it is possible to classify igneous rocks and to draw interpretations about: The petrogenesis and evolution of igneous rocks. The thermal and barometric conditions in which a primary magma have formed. The magmatic processes that might be involved in the evolution of igneous rocks. The geotectonic environment in which igneous rocks might have formed. Specific programs for the evaluation of geochemical data of igneous rocks are rare and often very difficult to use.…

MatLab, SAS, STATA, SPSS, Excel users: Try R, damn it!

Due to my work with a multitude of statistical packages in my career I may be able to evaluate a lot of them. I’ve first used Excel for my calculations as most of the normal users do. I like the idea behind a spreadsheet and the combination of data and click-to-do functions. Nevertheless I’ve often managed to gain control again over my spreadsheets as they’ve evolved to some unintelligible things on my hard drive. The ruler of this evolution was spreadsheet “data_results_0.9.1a_final_b_ws.xls”…