Digital Geography

Create Bounding Boxes without Desktop GIS

Bounding boxes are crucial for a lot of geospatial projects: wether you need to limit the extent of your web mapping application or need to cut your research data to the area of interest, bounding boxes are used everywhere. Here is a nice little tool from Klokantech that helps you generating bounding boxes in a variety of formats in your browser, without even opening your desktop GIS.

Short Announcement: QGIS 3.0 is on its way

QGIS 3.0 is the next big release in terms of features and tools. As it is stated in this e-mail chain we could expect this new major release in late 2017 and time is passing fast: retire 2.14 in June 2017 2.18 becomes LTR from June 2017 to 2018 3.0 feature freeze in July 2017 release 3.0 in Sept 2017 release 3.2 as next LTR in release 3.0 + 4 Months (eta June 2018) Yet this timeline is not strict and [was?] under discussion. We might expect a new candidate loaded with some cool and uncool features.

Proud of the Linux world

Sometimes I have something to tell, but also need to realize that it is not so easy to explain. How many times have you heard of Linux, or maybe Ubuntu? Probably very often, right? I imagine that the comments were (between you and those who spoke, newspaper or friend who is): “Do I need to delete Windows?”, “It is easy, just if you know to program!” or “but there are problems with the printer…” But what makes me proud is when I ask the question, but you use it for work? The Linux world has had a big leap forward…

Evolving Geographic Information System: OpenWebGIS plans & its crowdfunding campaign

Perhaps you have already used in your work OpenWebGIS or just have seen it or read about it. Due to this system exists since 2014. But we will describe OpenWebGIS briefly. It is an open source online/offline geographic information system for work in web browser or mobile app. Since its foundation, a great number of users have benefited from using this system functions.

5 reasons why I blog

5 reasons why I blog, and why shall you. About 4 years ago I started blogging and building a website/blog with content about GIS, geodata and programming. As I am an IT consultant for banks and mainly working as a testmanager in a SAP-software surrounding in Switzerland you might ask: “Why the heck do you this?”. Check out my motivation and reasons why I blog and spend time here.

Conference INTERGEO 2015

Last years INTERGEO in Berlin was an interesting experience for a newbie in the world of geodesy like I am. This year I will also attend the INTERGEO in Stuttgart. It will take place from the 15th to the 17th of September. This year’s main points: The spotlight will be on Geospatial 4.0, the digital economy, transformation through digitization, big data, the Internet of Things, digital infrastructures and smart cities.

Heatmap and Interpolation: it is easy in OpenWebGIS

In this article we consider the creation of Heatmap and Interpolation with the help of OpenWebGIS interface. In the next article it is planned to describe its technical implementation using JavaScript, OpenLayers 2.x and canvas element (as part of HTML5 technology). Recently, in an article “Some new (June 2015) features and functions in OpenWebGIS” it has been announced to revise the interpolation module completely. This promise has been kept, and at the moment in OpenWebGIS you can build a heatmap and make interpolation by the method of Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW). It is planned to add (if it is possible)…

GISgirls – where are the women? 4 theses

Typically GIS and geodata nerds are male. Anyhow, 99.9 % of our contacts, freelancer sign ups, comment writers here on the blog are boys. But where are the GIS girls and women? There must be thousands of well educated, very interested hackathon-proven GIS ladies out there. In order to getting in touch with that obviously shy species, I formulated 4 theses about GISgirls. Hopefully many active GIS and geodata girls (and women) will read that and comment in the bottom section. I would be very happy to get your feedback!

Map a whole city with OpenStreetMap

One day last month, I came back to OpenStreetMap, to see how the city of Legnano (city of 60k people – near Milan – Italy) was mapped. I knew I did not find much, but hoped it would have been mapped to a large extent. I immediately created an atlas with the online tool mapOSMatic and the result can be found here: Download PDF Atlas of Legnano (as it was) or go to the repository mapOSMatic I always talk about OpenStreetMap on my blog and I invite and teach all kinds of mapping. When I realized the state it was in my city,…

The Geography of Tweets: Reading Tweets with QGIS

Anita showed some nice examples of tweets in QGIS in 2012. Since then it seemed to be quiet about the twitter-content in QGIS. Yet tweets can be an interesting source of information. Sometimes they can tell you something about the spatiotemporal dimensions regarding a keyword, the digital heartbeat of a defined region and many more. Yet we need to be careful with the data as it is completely biased. But how to get this data stream into QGIS?

Open Data in the UK

The Ordnance Survey is UK’s mapping agency and frequently releases free datasets. Their OpenData policy is quite progressive compared to Germany’s and they’ve recently published some fresh datasets that anyone can use. All you need to do is to register and to acknowledge them. The new datasets are: OS Open Map – Local; OS Open Names; OS Open Rivers; and OS Open Roads. They include data on urban and rural features, an index for all the location names in the UK, a generalised open water network, UK’s connected road network and much more. All this adds up to their existing…