Digital Geography

Accessing Landsat and Sentinel-2 on Amazon Web services

The cloud has made it easier to process large amount of data, and satellite imagery processing benefits from cloud processing too. One of the cloud services that offers access to satellite images, and abilities to process them in the cloud – no more need to download it to your computer and process it there – is Amazon Web Services. If you’ve never worked with cloud processing, getting started with AWS can be a bit daunting. This tutorial gives beginners an introduction to accessing satellite images – Landsat and Sentinel-2 – on AWS.

Software I use in both worlds: Windows & Ubuntu

I am somehow a messy guy. After 3 years now my OS was a bit “stuffed” and I decided to go with the flow, erased the whole HDD and installed the new Ubuntu 16.04. LTS Xenial Xerus. Aside from being a Linux user I also work a lot on Windows PCs. SO what tools do I use on my systems that are needed for my everyday GIS / geo-developer tasks? Let me show you my list:

Extracting information from Sentinel-1

SAR images can see through clouds and in darkness, and are therefore very useful for operational monitoring of our seas. Detecting ships, icebergs, wind patterns, and oil spills is daily business in Europe with the Sentinel-1 satellite. Want to see for yourself how to extract information from a SAR image? In this tutorial, we’ll use the SNAP toolbox for Sentinel-1 to extract information on the number of ships at sea.

Open Data in the UK

The Ordnance Survey is UK’s mapping agency and frequently releases free datasets. Their OpenData policy is quite progressive compared to Germany’s and they’ve recently published some fresh datasets that anyone can use. All you need to do is to register and to acknowledge them. The new datasets are: OS Open Map – Local; OS Open Names; OS Open Rivers; and OS Open Roads. They include data on urban and rural features, an index for all the location names in the UK, a generalised open water network, UK’s connected road network and much more. All this adds up to their existing…

short announcement: new R learning material

Coursera, hail to Coursera. Despite the uprising criticism on MOOCs and their footprint in the educational landscape at universities Coursera created an interesting R learning course. It is divided and scheduled for 4 weeks and has video-tutorials as well as written material. The guys over at RevolutionAnalytics packed it all together: Content: Setting working directory and getting help How to get help Data Types Subsetting Vectorized Operations Reading/Writing Data Control Structures in R Writing Functions Avoiding loops using xapply Plotting Regular expressions Regular expressions in R Classes and methods in R It is a free course and is very userfriendly. The…

short announcement: huge categorized list of geodata

Thanks to @seandebasti who enjoyed this year’s “Society of Cartographers Annual Conference” at Staffordshire University who send us a short link on Twitter. The link provides a huge list of 319 freely usable geodata catalogues. Robin who created this list put it on the table via linkedin first and was highly “liked” for this. He covers several topics: Elevation Weather and Climate Natural Disasters Land Cover/ Land Cover Ecology and many more … If you’re interested in his activities you may also want to check Robin’s blog. He blogs about GIS, Cartography and also tutorials with a wide view. You…

Free Sources of Geospatial Raster Data

I’m always looking for good sources of free data, so I thought I would post a few here in case they were useful to others. The sources listed below tend to be larger providers of regional to global level data, however, please post suggestions in the comments if there are other sources you like and think should be added. I had initially planned to include vector data here, but I think that will be another post as this one got quite long. SAR Data Free Synthetic Aperture Radar data can be some of the hardest to find, but it is…