Digital Geography

CSV to HTML 101 webmap

Alright, away from python scripting, I want to share a small tool CSV to HTML 101 with you, guys. I used VB.NET to develop it in order to help non-GIS experts from converting a CSV file to a web page using leaflet.JS library. Honestly, it’s not that complicated tool, but it gives them that push to start a web map especially if they have not dug that deep in web development, javascript and leaflet. However, I’m one of these people, so  please don’t judge my ugly code 😳 The developed tool should meet the following criteria: Simple enough to be used by my grandma.…

Spatial Big-Data: 10 stunning services

In the last month the German website Spiegel-Online showed some nice examples of big-data combined with geodata. Geodata get’s more important with every GPS-enabled device that is sold, form that will store your address, IP that is monitored, customer in a global market. Let me Introduce you some stunning examples of geo-enabled web applications. Maybe you get some inspiration to power your business with some spatial data too.

Routing in QGIS… with OSM

Routing with Google is quite cool as the database/network is probably the best currently available. But the terms of services limit the possible usage. So what about OpenStreetMap? By figuring out how to use OSM for routing I found it much easier to get routes into QGIS with OSM compared to the Google way. Check it out….

Overview: R Cheat Sheets

Recently we had a discussion about where to find a nice cheat sheet (No! We are not talking about Simon the Sorcerer walk-throughs). Especially for scripting languages cheat sheets are an excellent way to support your learning attempts and are a handy tool for your every work in data visualisation, automation of tasks and analysis steps. So let’s have a look on R cheat sheets.

Panorama Geodata eXtractor

It’s been a while since I wrote here on DG, but I’ve been busy writing on my own blog in Swedish. However, now it’s time to reveal something I’m pretty pleased with, that you maby can use as well. A simple (well reasonably so) method to extract geodata from panoramic photographs, by using open javascript libraries, some javascript of my own and a lot of head scratching.

ArcGIS Open Data

For a year, ESRI’s open data initiative is online. As I’ve heard about it for the first time I was just thinking: nice move to get people into their ArcGIS online environment. But I have to admit: I was not looking and exploring their platform. Now I stumbled upon a recent post on reddit and there it was again: opendata.arcgis.com has 25,000+ open datasets all accessible by a common API. Full disclosure: I work on the team that builds the product. So let’s have a look at it…

DataSF or how to do open data right

In 2010 the City and County of San Francisco’s official open data portal was launched. To me it is the ultimate experience for publishing/consuming open data: based on a WordPress system the city distributes data for several categories: Economy and Community City Management and Ethics Transportation Public Safety Health and Social Services Geographic Locations and Boundaries Energy and Environment Housing and Buildings City Infrastructure Culture and Recreation There are 820 datasets available at the moment. Depending on the source of the dataset you will either be able to download the data directly or to display it as table: You can…

Maptime Berlin: what was/what will be

In the middle of September the first Maptime Berlin took place. I was totally amazed to see so many people sitting there, being interested in mapping, opensource, cartography and software. At least 40 people from different places of the world with different background (sociology, coding, styling, etc.) met at the Supermarkt Berlin (an open place to work together) to share their knowledge and learn new stuff. Here just a few photos: What was done at MaptimeBER After a short introduction from everyone Alsino presented what is Maptime all about: bringing people together, share the joy of creating and consuming maps…

Overview: Newest developments from ESRI

At this years 11th geoforum of central Germany ESRI showed some new developments in their ArcGIS online portfolio. Those were published 23rd of September. Let me please introduce you to some of these features. If you came across the website of ESRI you might have mentioned that current ArcGIS offline or desktop applications are beyond the functional possibilities of the new ArcGIS online framework. One of these was the new multi-directional shadow algorithm which came on stage on the ArcGIS online platform and is now a downloadable function. Of course they will be available with the upcoming ArcGIS pro but…

Map Compare – a direct comparison of basemaps and cartogrphic styles

Driven of the high usability of webmaps for companies and projects, many background-styles are available online. The existing styles can be easily implemented in your own project-map. Depending on the thematic map approach it’s appropriate to use a topographic, minimal-graphic or thematic reduced map-style to get the best basemap as groundlayer for your overlaid vector-data. The webapp “Map Compare” made by Wolfram Schneider makes it easy to compare available basemaps and cartographic styles and is one of my favorite “smart tools” for digital mapping projects.

Mapshaper.org – easy editing polygon and polyline datasets for mapping purposes

Mapshaper by mbloch is one of my favourite “swiss army knife”-tools if you need fast data reduction and topology first aid in polygon data handling. There a two versions of mapshaper. The first is a hosted webservice: www.mapshaper.org, where you can easily upload .shp-, GeoJson- or TopoJson-Files via drag&drop or folder selection. Afterwards you have to chose your simplification method (Douglas-Peucker, Visvalingam or modified Visvalingam) and some other options like “repair intersections”, “auto snap” and “prevent shape removal” and you’re ready to go.